A.I. News

  • Researchers have installed electronic 'brains' on solar-powered robots that are 100 to 250 micrometers in size — smaller than an ant's head — so that they can walk autonomously without being externally controlled.
  • Researchers introduce a new neurocomputational model of the human brain that could bridge the gap in understanding AI and the biological mechanisms underlying mental disorders.
  • Deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) don't see objects the way humans do — using configural shape perception — and that could be dangerous in real-world AI applications. The study employed novel visual stimuli called 'Frankensteins' to explore how the human brain and DCNNs process holistic, configural object properties.
  • A team has developed a novel approach for comparing neural networks that looks within the 'black box' of artificial intelligence to help researchers understand neural network behavior. Neural networks recognize patterns in datasets; they are used everywhere in society, in applications such as virtual assistants, facial recognition systems and self-driving cars.
  • Scientists explore the potential uses of integrated unmanned aerial vehicles and mobile robots for public good.
  • Biophysicists have developed control software that optimizes how fluorescence microscopes collect data on living samples. Their control loop, used to image mitochondrial and bacterial sites of division in detail, is released as an open source plug-in and could inspire a new generation of intelligent microscopes.
  • Artificial intelligence could help clinicians assess which patients are likely to encounter the harmful side effects of some commonly used antidepressants, antihistamines and bladder medicines.
  • Abrahamic texts treat slithering as a special indignity visited on the wicked serpent, but evolution may draw a more continuous line through the motion of swimming microbes, wriggling worms, skittering spiders and walking horses. A new study found that all of these kinds of motion are well represented by a single mathematical model.
  • Computer scientists have succeeded in developing a method for systematically finding the optimal quantum operation sequence for a quantum computer. They have developed a systematic method that applies optimal control theory (GRAPE algorithm) to identify the theoretically optimal sequence from among all conceivable quantum operation sequences. This method is expected to become a useful tool for medium-scale quantum computers and is expected to contribute to improving the performance of quantum computers and reducing environmental impact in the near future.
  • Robots can be better at detecting mental wellbeing issues in children than parent-reported or self-reported testing, a new study suggests.

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